ITR21
Issued
09 Mar 2010

2010 International tax disclosure exemption

ITR21 covers 2010 international tax disclosure exemptions where disclosure is not necessary for the administration of the international tax rules.

Introduction

Section 61 of the Tax Administration Act 1994 ("TAA") requires taxpayers to disclose interests in foreign entities.

Section 61(1) of the TAA states that a person who has a control or income interest in a foreign company or an attributing interest in a foreign investment fund (FIF) at any time during the income year must disclose the interest held.1 However, section 61(2) of the TAA allows the Commissioner of Inland Revenue to exempt any person or class of persons from this requirement if disclosure is not necessary for the administration of the international tax rules (as defined in section YA 1) contained in the Income Tax Act 2007 ("the ITA").

To balance the revenue forecasting and risk assessment needs of the Commissioner with the compliance costs of taxpayers providing the information, the Commissioner has issued an international tax disclosure exemption under section 61(2) of the TAA that applies for the income year corresponding to the tax year ended 31 March 2010. This exemption may be cited as "International Tax Disclosure Exemption ITR21" and the full text appears at the end of this item.


1 In the case of partnerships, disclosure needs to be made by the individual partners in the partnership. The partnership itself is not required to disclose.


Scope of exemption

The scope of the 2010 exemption is the same as the 2009 exemption although taxpayers with interests in controlled foreign companies (CFCs) and balance dates between 30 June and 30 September (inclusive), for whom the new international tax rules apply, are required to complete a new prescribed electronic form in relation to CFC disclosure. These changes are outlined further below.

Application date

This exemption applies for the income year corresponding to the tax year ending 31 March 2010.

Summary

In summary, the 2010 international tax disclosure exemption removes the requirement of a resident to disclose:

  • an interest of less than 10% in a foreign company that is not an attributing interest in a FIF, or is an attributing interest in a FIF in respect of which no FIF income or loss arises under either section CQ 5(1)(d) or section DN 6(1)(d) of the Income Tax Act 2007
  • if the resident is not a widely-held entity, an attributing interest in a FIF that is an income interest of less than 10%, if the foreign entity is incorporated (in the case of a company) or otherwise tax resident in a treaty country, and the fair dividend rate or comparative value method of calculation is used
  • if the resident is a widely-held entity, an attributing interest in a FIF that is an income interest of less than 10% and the fair dividend rate or comparative value method is used. The resident is instead required to disclose the end-of-year New Zealand dollar market value of such investments split by the jurisdiction in which the attributing interest in a FIF is held or listed.

The 2010 disclosure exemption also removes the requirement for a non-resident or transitional resident to disclose interests held in foreign companies and FIFs.

Explanation

Generally, residents who hold an income interest or a control interest in a foreign company, or an attributing interest in a FIF are required to disclose these interests to the Commissioner. These interests are considered in further detail below.

Attributing interest in a FIF

A resident is required to disclose an attributing interest in a FIF where FIF income or FIF loss arises through the use of one of the following calculation methods:

  • branch equivalent, accounting profits, deemed rate of return or cost methods; or
  • fair dividend rate or comparative value methods where the resident is a "widely-held entity"; or
  • fair dividend rate or comparative value methods, the resident is not a widely-held entity and the country in which the attributing interest is incorporated or otherwise tax resident in a country that New Zealand does not have a double tax agreement in force as at 31 March 2010.

The 35 countries that New Zealand does have a double tax agreement in force as at 31 March 2010 are listed below.

Australia
Austria
Belgium
Canada
Chile
China
Czech Republic
Denmark
Fiji
Finland
France
Germany
India
Indonesia
Ireland
Italy
Japan
Korea
Malaysia
Mexico
Netherlands
Norway
Philippines
Poland
Russian Federation
Singapore
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Taiwan
Thailand
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
United States of America

No disclosure is required by non-widely-held taxpayers for attributing interests in FIFs that are incorporated or otherwise tax resident in a tax treaty country, if the fair dividend rate or comparative value methods of calculation are used.

A "widely-held entity" for the purposes of this disclosure is an entity which is a:

  • portfolio investment entity (this includes a portfolio investment-linked life fund); or
  • widely-held company; or
  • widely-held superannuation fund, or
  • widely-held group investment fund ("GIF").

Portfolio investment entity, widely-held company, widely-held superannuation fund and widely-held GIF are all defined in section YA 1 of the ITA 2007.

The disclosure required by widely-held entities of attributing interests in FIFs which use the fair dividend rate or the comparative value method of calculation is that, for each calculation method, they disclose the end-of-year New Zealand dollar market value of investments split by the jurisdiction in which the attributing interest in a FIF is held or listed. A split by currency in which the investment is held, will also be accepted as long as it is a reasonable proxy - that is at least 90-95% accurate - for the underlying jurisdictions. For example, investments denominated in euros will not be able to meet this test and so euro-based investments will need to be split into the underlying jurisdictions.

FIF interests

The types of interests that fall within the scope of section 61(1) of the TAA are:

  • rights in a foreign company or anything deemed to be a company for the purposes of the ITA (eg, a unit trust)
  • an entitlement to benefit from a foreign superannuation scheme
  • an entitlement to benefit from a foreign life insurance policy
  • an interest in an entity specified in schedule25, part A of the ITA (no entities were listed at the time of publication of the Tax Information Bulletin Vol 22, No 3, April 2010).

However, the following interests are exempt (under sections EX 31 to EX 43 of the ITA) from being an attributing interest in a FIF and do not have to be disclosed:

  • an income interest of 10% or more in a CFC (although separate disclosure is required of this as an interest in a foreign company)
  • certain interests in Australian resident companies listed on an approved index of the Australian Stock Exchange and required to maintain a franking account (refer to the IR871 form)
  • an interest in an Australian unit trust that has an RWT proxy with either a high turnover or high distributions
  • an interest of 10% or more in a foreign company that is treated as resident in a country or territory specified in the grey list
  • an interest in certain grey-list companies (only interests in Guinness Peat Group plc qualify for this exemption)
  • an interest in an employment-related foreign superannuation scheme
  • certain foreign pensions or annuities (see our booklet Overseas pensions and annuity schemes (IR257) under "Forms and guides" for more information)
  • an interest in certain venture capital investments in New Zealand resident start-up companies that migrate to a grey-list country
  • an interest in certain grey-list companies owning New Zealand venture capital companies
  • an interest in certain grey-list companies resulting from shares acquired under a venture investment agreement
  • an interest in certain grey-list companies resulting from the acquisition of shares under an employee share scheme
  • an interest held by a natural person in a foreign entity located in a country where exchange controls prevent the person deriving any profit or gain or disposing of the interest for New Zealand currency or consideration readily convertible to New Zealand currency.

Interests in foreign entities held by a natural person not acting as a trustee also do not have to be disclosed if the total cost of the interests remains under $50,000 at all times during the income year. This disclosure exemption is made because no FIF income under section CQ 5 of the ITA or FIF loss under section DN 6 arises in respect of these interests.

Format of disclosure

The forms for the disclosure of FIF interests are as follows:

  • IR439 form for the accounting profits method
  • IR440 form for the branch equivalent method
  • IR443 form for the deemed rate of return method
  • IR445 form for the fair dividend rate method (for widely-held entities)
  • IR446 form for the comparative value method (for widely-held entities)
  • IR447 form for the fair dividend rate method (for individuals or non-widely-held entities)
  • IR448 form for the comparative value method (for individuals or non-widely-held entities)
  • IR449 form for the cost method.

The IR445 and IR446 forms must be completed online. The IR447, IR448 and IR449 forms may be completed online. The online forms can be found at www.ird.govt.nz "Get it done online", "Foreign investment fund disclosure".

As a transitional measure for non-portfolio FIFs using the branch equivalent or accounting profits methods, an alternative to using the IR439 and IR440 forms is acceptable for the income year corresponding to the tax year ending 31 March 2010. For each calculation method, an acceptable alternative disclosure will be a schedule outlining all the FIF interests of a particular taxpayer and must, as a minimum, include the following information:

  • details of the taxpayer filing the form, including name, IRD number, contact details
  • details of the FIF, including name, business activity, balance date, country of residence, address
  • nature of the taxpayer’s FIF interest (ie, shares or units)
  • details of the taxpayer's income interest percentage (including details of the measurement basis used)
  • currency the financial statements were prepared in
  • calculation of FIF income or loss including conversion rate and NZD conversion calculation
  • details of any loss offset or loss to carry forward
  • details of any foreign tax credit available (including details of NZD conversion calculation).

A scanned copy of the audited financial statements of the FIF must also accompany the schedule(s).

The alternative disclosure schedules and audited financial accounts should be sent to the following email address: 439440disclosure@ird.govt.nz.

The alternative disclosure schedule filed must also be printed, dated and signed by the taxpayer as true and correct. This should be held on file by the taxpayer and may be requested by the Commissioner.

Income interest of 10% or more in a foreign company

A resident is required to disclose an income interest of 10% or more in a foreign company. This obligation to disclose applies to all foreign companies regardless of the country of residence. For this purpose, the following interests need to be considered:

  1. an income interest held directly in a foreign company
  2. an income interest held indirectly through any interposed foreign company
  3. an income interest held by an associated person (not being a controlled foreign company) as defined by the parts of subpart YB of the ITA that apply for the purposes of the "1988 version provisions".

To determine whether a resident has an income interest of 10% or more for CFCs, sections EX 14 to EX 17 of the ITA should be applied. To determine whether a resident has an income interest of 10% or more in any entity that is not a CFC, for the purposes of this exemption, sections EX 14 to EX 17 should be applied to the foreign company as if it were a CFC.

Format of disclosure
New international tax rules have been introduced for calculating income from a CFC. These rules apply for all income years beginning on or after 1 July 2009. Entities with late balance dates between 30 June 2010 and 30 September 2010 (inclusive) will begin their 2010 income year on or after 1 July 2009. Therefore, entities with balance dates between 30 June and 30 September (inclusive) will apply the new rules from their 2010 income year.

Disclosure of interests in a controlled foreign company, by an entity applying the new rules, is required using a Controlled foreign companies disclosure (IR458) form.

The IR458 form must be completed online, you can find it under "Forms and guides".

Disclosure of interests in a controlled foreign company, by an entity applying the old rules, and interests in a foreign company that is not a controlled foreign company, is required using either an IR477 or IR479 form (Interest in a foreign company disclosure schedule) as appropriate.

Overlap of interests

It is possible that a resident may be required to disclose an interest in a foreign company which also constitutes an attributing interest in a FIF. For example, a person with an income interest of 10% or greater in a foreign company which is not a CFC is strictly required to disclose both an interest held in a foreign company and an attributing interest in a FIF.

To meet disclosure requirements, only one form of disclosure is required for each interest. If the interest is an attributing interest in a FIF, then the appropriate disclosure for the calculation method, as discussed previously, must be made.

In all other cases, the IR477 or IR479 must be used if the new international tax rules do not yet apply, and the IR458 if they do.

Interests held by non-residents and transitional residents

Interests held by non-residents and transitional residents in foreign companies and FIFs do not need to be disclosed.

This would apply for example to an overseas company operating in New Zealand (through a branch) in respect of its interests in foreign companies and FIFs; or to a transitional resident with interests in a foreign company or an attributing interest in a FIF.

Under the international tax rules, non-residents and transitional residents are not required to calculate or attribute income under either the CFC or FIF rules. Therefore disclosure of non-residents' or transitional residents' holdings in foreign companies or FIFs is not necessary for the administration of the international tax rules and so an exemption is made for this group.

Persons not required to comply with section 61 of the Tax Administration Act 1994

This exemption may be cited as "International Tax Disclosure Exemption ITR21".

1. Reference

This exemption is made under section 61(2) of the Tax Administration Act 1994. It details interests in foreign companies and attributing interests in FIFs in relation to which any person is not required to comply with the requirements in section 61 of the Tax Administration Act 1994 to make disclosure of their interests, for the income year ending 31 March 2010.

2. Interpretation

For the purpose of this disclosure exemption to determine an income interest of 10% or more, sections EX 14 to EX 17 of the Income Tax Act 2007 apply for interests in controlled foreign companies. In the case of attributing interests in FIFs, those sections are to be applied as if the FIF were a CFC.

The relevant definition of "associated persons" is contained in the parts of subpart YB of the Income Tax Act 2007 that apply for the purposes of the "1988 version provisions".

Otherwise, unless the context requires, expressions used have the same meaning as in section YA 1 of the Income Tax Act 2007.

3. Exemption

  1. Any person who holds an income interest of less than 10% in a foreign company, including interests held by associated persons, that is not an attributing interest in a FIF, or that is an attributing interest in a FIF in respect of which no FIF income or loss arises under either section CQ 5(1)(d) or section DN 6(1)(d) of the Income Tax Act 2007, is not required to comply with section 61(1) of the Tax Administration Act 1994 for that interest and that income year.
  2. Any person who is a portfolio investment entity, widely-held company, widely-held superannuation fund or widely-held GIF, who has an attributing interest in a FIF, other than a direct interest of 10% or more in a foreign company that is not a foreign investment vehicle, and uses the fair dividend rate or comparative value calculation method for that interest, is not required to comply with section 61(1) of the Tax Administration Act 1994 in respect of that interest and that income year, if the person discloses the end-of-year New Zealand dollar market value of investments, in an electronic format prescribed by the Commissioner, split by the jurisdiction in which the attributing interest in a FIF is held or listed.
  3. Any person who is not a portfolio investment entity, widely-held company, widely-held superannuation fund or widely-held GIF, who has an attributing interest in a FIF, other than a direct income interest of 10% or more, and uses the fair dividend rate or comparative value calculation method is not required to comply with section 61(1) of the Tax Administration Act 1994 in respect of that interest and that income year, to the extent that the FIF is incorporated or tax resident in a country with which New Zealand has a double tax agreement in force at 31 March 2010.
  4. Any non-resident person or transitional resident who has an income interest or a control interest in a foreign company or an attributing interest in a FIF in the income year corresponding to the tax year ending 31 March 2010, is not required to comply with section 61(1) of the Tax Administration Act 1994 in respect of that interest and that income year if either or both of the following apply:
    • no attributed CFC income or loss arises in respect of that interest in that foreign company under sections CQ 2(1)(d) or DN 2(1)(d) of the Income Tax Act 2007; and/or
    • no FIF income or loss arises in respect of that interest in that FIF under sections CQ 5(1)(f) or DN 6(1)(f) of the Income Tax Act 2007.

This exemption is made by me acting under delegated authority from the Commissioner of Inland Revenue pursuant to section 7 of the Tax Administration Act 1994.

This exemption is signed on the 9th of March 2010.

Tony Morris
Assurance Manager (Large Enterprises)